According to the American chef Anthony Bourdain,

"Your body is not a temple, it's an amusement park. Enjoy the ride." But a life at an amusement park takes its toll. A study by the Southern Medical University of Guangzhou in China has shown that working in the hospitality industry is one of the most stressful sectors. What are the consequences for the hard-working heroes of our industry? Studies have shown that working in the hospitality industry is one of the most stressful sectors.

Chef’s trouble: being overweight

Tom Kerridge, 45 years old, England

Tom Kerridge worked at several London restaurants from the age of 18 to 32. In 2005, together with his wife Beth, he opened his own gastropub Hand & Flowers in Marlow for which he received his first Michelin star in 2006. In 2012, the second star followed. It was the first pub in the history of the Michelin Guide that received two Michelin stars. Great recognition for Tom and Beth, but fame took its toll. Tom would never have called himself slim, but as the honor increased, so did Tom’s weight. Too many drinks, irregular eating habits and late-night snacks after work meant the pounds started piling on.


Chef’s trouble: having an eating disorder

Margarita Forés, 59 years old, Philippines

Margarita Forés was named the best female chef in Asia in 2016. She owns several restaurants, including the restaurant chain ‘Cibo’, an Italian café concept based in Manila, the Philippines. Margarita Forés developed bulimia in her teenage years. The exact cause of her bulimia is unclear; it probably stemmed from the feeling she had of never having had her own identity. She grew up in a large family called the Araneta family which is one of the most influential families in the Philippines. Her upbringing did not contribute to her confident self-development; she instead developed an inferiority complex which resulted in an eating disorder.


Chef’s trouble: relationship problems

Anthony Bourdain, 62 years old, United States

Anthony Bourdain started his career as a chef in several restaurants in New York. His real breakthrough as a well-known chef came with the launch of his book ‘Kitchen Confidential’ and his TV program ‘No Reservations’. The fact that he enjoyed a life full of sex, drugs and rock and roll is well-known. He found it hard to find a balance between his work life and his private life. The attention and fame was a welcome distraction from all the hard work. Despite his hectic life he married twice, but both marriages ended in divorce.


Chef’s trouble: cocaine addiction

Phil Howard, 52 years old, South Africa / England

As a young chef, Phil Howard opened his own restaurant ‘The Square’ in London at the age of 24. He worked six days a week and slept four hours a night on average. The restaurant grew more and more in name and fame. Phil became a well-known chef. But this acclaim had its downside. The more successful the restaurant became, the harder Phil had to work. He kept setting the bar higher and higher. He needed to work even more hours, started sleeping fewer and became increasingly fatigued as the days went by. Cocaine gave him the energy he needed to get through the day. In the beginning it went well, but when the addiction got the upper hand, his work suffered. He lost the pleasure he used to find in cooking, his attention to detail, his appetite and his taste.
                  


Chef’s trouble: depression

Daniel Patterson, 49 years old, United States

Daniel Patterson is the owner of the eponymous ‘Daniel Patterson Group’, a company in the catering industry that includes several restaurants and concepts, including the three-starred restaurant ‘Coi’ in San Francisco. Throughout his life, Daniel suffered from depression and struggled with periods of feeling either up or down. It seems paradoxical, but the more successful the catering group became, the more the ‘up’ periods eluded him. The pressure and hostility caused Daniel to sink further and further into the sadder spectrum of emotions. The success did not lead to positive feelings, in fact, Daniel's creativity and pleasure in cooking declined as sales increased.